Author’s Showcase

Wednesday, July 17, 2019 | Artisan Gallery

6:30pm – 7:30pm Public Lecture

Poetry Reading

J. Barrett Wolf

Writer, Poet

J. Barrett Wolf has been writing for over forty years. He has received numerous awards, including First Place from the Performance Poets Association of Nassau County and a Broome County Arts Council grant to produce the reading series “Here & There: Poets from Near and Far”, He was commissioned to write the tenth-anniversary poem for the Broome County Public Library.

He’s been published in Black Bear Review, Portland Review of the Arts, Long Island Sounds, Rubber Side Down, PPA Literary Review, Writing Outside the Lines, and Passing and was on the Connecticut Touring Poetry Roster.

His first volume, “Stark Raving Calm,” was published by Boone’s Dock Press. His newest book “Kissing the Moon from your Back,” will be out later this summer.

He has just returned from Scotland where he attended the annual Arran Island Poetry Adventure, working, sharing, and performing with British and Irish poets. He lives here in Binghamton, where he hosts the monthly open mike at The Bundy Museum, and voices “A Time For Words,” poetry interview show on WBDY-FM 99.5.

Saturday, July 20, 2019 | Artisan Gallery

1:00pm – 300pm Public Lectures

Mini Talks

Michelle Schleider

Artist

1:00 PM | Mini Talk

Michelle Schleider (b.1974) has been painting since she was 16 yrs. old, has a BA in Studio Art, studied painting and drawing in Florence, Italy and has taken several workshops by many influential artists throughout the US. She works out of her studio in Vestal, NY and is an instructor at KAPOW! Art Studio. Schleider is an oil painter of realism with a focus on the portrait, figure, and more recently, florals. She has a passion for painting those she meets and knows. Her paintings often reflect the model’s inner creativity and a little bit of their personal story.

Sarah Horan

Artist

1:15 PM | Mini Talk – Contact

Sarah Horan (b. 1987) earned a BA in Visual Arts Education from SUNY New Paltz and an MFA in Photography from the Savannah College of Art and Design. Since then she has been teaching both on the public and collegiate level while creating new work which is internationally recognized. ‘Contact,’ is a series created with a hand-held scanner. It questions the role of the voyeur and voyee in a society obsessed with digital and visual communication.

Natalie Dadamio

Artist

1:45 PM | Mini Talk – Process & Practice

Natalie Dadamio (b.1979) is an artist living in Upstate NY. Dadamio is mostly self-taught, and returned to serious art making in Spring 2018.

“I see my paintings as excavations and invitations. Every day they ask of me to be present, to remember, and to enter into an unknown dialogue. They teach me that we all have a story to tell, and a song to sing and it is through the telling and creating that we return home to each other.” – Natalie Dadamio

Paulette Hackman

Artist

2:00 PM | Mini Talk

Paulette Hackman is a writer, journalist, and former college instructor with a passion for fiber arts and rug hooking. She is author of Story Rugs and Their Storytellers: Rug Hooking in the Narrative Style, a collection of personal stories put to rugs by hooking artists around the world. Her original hooked hangings have appeared in several publications and at fiber art shows in Nova Scotia Canada. Hackman uses traditional rug hooking techniques as a means of self-expression, discovery, and, often, as a way to capture and preserve life’s memories. Her medium, fiber, includes recycled clothing and blankets, yardage off the bolt, handspun or commercial yarns and even, on occasion, cheesecloth—whatever achieves the effect she wants.

John Denninger

Artist

2:15 PM | Mini Talk

John Denninger (b. 1943) is an Upstate New York photographer. He graduated from CUNY Manhattan with a degree in Advanced Level Mathematics. Denninger photographs based on chance encounters with spaces that are contingent on a specific set of conditions.

Teri Franzen

Artist

2:30 PM | Mini Talk

A software engineer for most of her adult life, Teri Franzen recently shifted gears toward nature photography, film-making, writing and education. As a member of the Waterman Conservation Education Center board of directors, Franzen has introduced programs teaching natural history through photography. Franzen’s focus as a nature photographer is to study and photograph natural history. Through research and observation, she develops an intimate understanding of her wild subjects and works to capture behaviors in a naturally beautiful setting. Sharing those images and stories, she hopes to raise awareness of the beauty that surrounds us and cultivate a conservation mindset.

Past:

Saturday, July 13, 2019 | Artisan Gallery

1:00pm – 300pm Public Lectures

Mini Talks

Christina Muscatello

Memory Maker Project | Co-Founder & Program Director

1:00 PM | Mini Talk – Memory Maker Project

Christina Muscatello graduated with a masters in Integrated Teaching Through the Arts from Lesley University. She is the co-founder and director of the Memory Maker Project since 2015, where she provides art and culture opportunities for people living with memory loss and their loved ones. Muscatello encourages people living with memory loss to explore a variety of art materials while building confidence, connection, and a strong quality of life.

Linda Ciallelo

Artist

1:15 PM | Mini Talk

Linda Ciallelo (b.1948) is a practicing artist living in Binghamton, N.Y. Linda has been winning awards and selling her artwork in the central New York area and around the country, since she was 14 years old. She is self taught but was able to complete one year of college in Cazenovia, NY in 1988. Ciallelo produces realistic representational oil paintings, pastel drawings, and pencil drawings. Her subject matter at this time is mostly figurative and still life.

Karen Kurcharski

Artist

1:45 PM | Mini Talk

Karen Kucharski is a visual artist living in Tioga County. Kucharski graduated with a Master of Fine Arts from Syracuse University and a Bachelor of Arts from Binghamton University. Kucharski has taught at Cornell University, Dartmouth College, Binghamton University and in other educational settings. Kucharski works in drawing, painting, printmaking, and digital forms. She focuses primarily on landscape and figurative work, often having cultural or primal references. Through Kucharski’s use of space and rhythm, the viewer is invited into an experience as portrayed.1:45 PM | Karen Kurcharski

Aldo Borromei

Artist

2:00 PM | Mini Talk

Aldo Borromei obtained an MA in 1996 in Education and Human Development from Binghamton University. After years of professional experience with ’spontaneous creativity’ through Jazz Improvisation and Hairstyling; crossing over into abstract, contemporary art represents Borroemei’s natural expressional progression. (see portfolio & history www.aldoimprovisationalart.com) 

James Mullen

Artist

2:30 PM | Mini Talk

James Mullen is Professor of Art and Dean Humanities and Fine Arts, Emeritus at SUNY Oneonta. Mr. Mullen has exhibited widely in national juried exhibitions with Purchase Awards to many collections. Ink and watercolors from on-site drawings at Chenango Valley State Park in which black is conceived as color as well as structure.

Wednesday, April 17, 2019 | Artisan Gallery

7:00pm Public Lecture

Poetry Reading

Jaimee Wriston Colbert

Professor of Creative Writing, Binghamton University

Jaimee Wriston Colbert is the author of six books of fiction: Vanishing Acts, a 2018 Foreword Indies Book of the Year Finalist, winner of a 2018 Pinnacle Book Achievement Award, and finalist for the 2018 American Fiction Prize and the National Indie Excellence Award in Literary Fiction; Wild Things, winner of the CNY 2017 Book Award in Fiction and the 2018 International Book Award in Fiction-Short Stories; Shark Girls, finalist for the USA Book News Best Books of 2010 and ForeWord Magazine Book of the Year; Dream Lives of Butterflies, winner of the IPPY Gold Medal/First Place Award for story collections; Climbing the God Tree, winner of the Willa Cather Fiction Prize; and Sex, Salvation, and the Automobile, winner of the Zephyr Prize. Her work has appeared in numerous journals, including The Gettysburg Review, New Letters, and Prairie Schooner, and broadcast on “Selected Shorts.” She was awarded the 2012 Ian MacMillan Fiction Prize for “Things Blow Up,” a story in Wild Things. Other stories won the Jane’s Stories Award and the Isotope Editor’s Fiction Prize. Originally from Hawai’i, she is Professor of Creative Writing at SUNY, Binghamton University.

Previous book publications:

Vanishing Acts: Fomite Press, 2018

Wild Things: BkMk Press, 2016

Shark Girls: Livingston Press, 2009

Dream Lives of Butterflies: BkMk Press, 2007

Climbing the God Tree: Helicon Nine Editions, 1998

Sex, Salvation, and the Automobile: Zephyr, 1994

Reading from:

“Vanishing Acts”

Vanishing Acts (book jacket)

Friday, April 26, 2019 | Artisan Gallery

7:00pm Public Lecture

Poetry Reading & Book Launch

Mike Jurkovic

Published Poet

A 2016 Pushcart nominee, poetry and musical criticism have appeared in over 500 magazines and periodicals. Full length collections, Blue Fan Whirring, (Nirala Press, 2018); smitten by harpies & shiny banjo catfish (Lion Autumn Press, 2016) Chapbooks, Eve’s Venom (Post Traumatic Press, 2014) Purgatory Road (Pudding House, 2010) Anthologies: 11/9 Fall of American Democracy Anthology, 2017 (Independent) Reflecting Pool: Poets & the Creative Process,  WaterWrites: A Hudson River Anthology, and Riverine: Anthology of Hudson Valley Writers (Codhill Press, 2018, 2009, 2007) Will Work For Peace (Zeropanik, 1999). President, Calling All Poets, New Paltz, Beacon, and Ellenville, NY. Music features, interviews, and CD reviews appear in All About Jazz, Van Wyck Gazette, and Maverick Chronicles 2018. He has featured in London, San Francisco, NYC, Albany, Baltimore, and throughout the tri-state area. He is the Tuesday night host of Jazz Sanctuary, WOOC 105.3 FM, Troy, NY. He was a monthly contributor to Elmore Magazine, 2008-2016; Folk and Acoustic Music Exchange, 2003-2010; and Chronogram, 2005-2007. His column, The Rock n Roll Curmudgeon, appeared in Rhythm and News Magazine, 1996-2003.

Reading from:

“Blue Fan Whirring,” and “smitten by harpies”

smitten by harpies (Book Jacket)

Susan Konz

Published Poet

Susan Konz is receiving her MFA from Hunter College in New York City. Her work has appeared in The Waymark, I Want You to See This Before I Leave and the CAPS Anthology. She is a regular contributor to the Calling All Poets Series in New Paltz, NY. In 2016, Lion Autumn Publishing released her first collection of poems entitled Second Sleep.

Saturday, April 6, 2019 | Artisan Gallery

1:00pm Public Lecture

Motherhood as Muse, two poets from the North Country on mothering, mentoring and muses

Elizabeth Cohen headshot

Elizabeth Cohen

Associate Professor of English
Plattsburgh State University

Elizabeth Cohen is a professor of English at SUNY Plattsburgh and the editor of Saranac Review. She is the author of eight books including the Family on Beartown Road, The Hypothetical Girl and 5 books of poetry.

Reading from:

“Vegetable Poetry: Honoring a mother’s kitchen in Verse.”

William Stratton

Lecturer, Plattsburgh State University

William Stratton currently lives in Vermont and teaches writing at SUNY Plattsburgh, thus spending a good deal of time on a ferry. He serves as co-editor of The Saranac Review, and is a father of two. His work has so far been nominated five times for the Pushcart Prize. He has two full-length collections of poetry, “Under the Water Was Stone” and “These Things Too Have Shape”. He has poetry published or forthcoming in: FIELD, Sugar House Review, Spillway, The North American Review, DMQ, Louisiana Literature, and others.

Reading from:

Under the Water Was Stone,” and “These Things Too have Shape”

These Things Too Have Shape (Book Jacket)

Monday, March 11th, 2019 | Phelps Mansion Museum

5:30pm – 7:00pm Public Lecture

Chris Mackowski headshot

Chris Mackowski

Ph.D., is the editor-in-chief and co-founder of Emerging Civil War

Chris Mackowski, Ph.D., is the editor-in-chief and co-founder of Emerging Civil War. He is the series editor of the award-winning Emerging Civil War Series, published by Savas Beatie, and the “Engaging the Civil War” Series, published in partnership with Southern Illinois University Press. Chris is a writing professor in the Jandoli School of Communication at St. Bonaventure University in Allegany, NY, where he also serves as associate dean for undergraduate programs. Chris is also historian-in-residence at Stevenson Ridge, a historic property on the Spotsylvania battlefield in central Virginia. He has also worked as a historian for the National Park Service at Fredericksburg & Spotsylvania National Military Park, where he gives tours at four major Civil War battlefields (Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, Wilderness, and Spotsylvania), as well as at the building where Stonewall Jackson died. Chris has authored or co-authored a dozen books on the Civil War, and his articles have appeared in all the major Civil War magazines. Chris serves on the board of directors for the Central Virginia Battlefields Trust and the national advisory board for the Civil War Chaplains Museum in Lynchburg, Virginia.

Grant’s Last Battle
The Story Behind The Personal Memoirs of Ulysses S. Grant Facing financial ruin and struggling against terminal throat cancer, Ulysses S. Grant fought his last battle to preserve the meaning of the American Civil War. His war of words, The Personal Memoirs of Ulysses S. Grant, would cement his place as not only one of America’s greatest heroes but also as one of its most sublime literary voices.

Tuesday, March 5th, 2019 | BCAC Conference Space

4:00pm – 5:00pm Public Reading & Book Talk

Martin Bidney: Bliss in Triple Rhythm

Martin Bidney

Professor Emeritus
Binghamton University

Join us in the BCAC conference space for a public reading and book talk by Martin Bidney. The focus of this reading is Bidney’s “Bliss in Triple Rhythm.” This book of word songs in unexpected melodic patterns will surprise you by its equally unusual liveliness.

Martin Bidney is an experienced Professor Emeritus at Binghamton University with a demonstrated thirty-five year history of working in higher education and since “retirement” a founder-editor of Dialogic Poetry Press and publisher of 23 books of poetry original and/or translated from Polish, Russian, and German (three of these titles with State University of New York Press). Skilled in verse translation and writing with a strong emphasis on faithfulness to rhythmic pattern and alliterative-assonantal word harmony. Strong education professional graduated with BA Indiana U, MA Harvard U, Ph.D. Indiana U.

Book of the Amphibrach (Book Jacket)

Thursday, February 21st, 2019 | Bundy Museum of History & Art

6:00pm – 9:00pm Film Showing

Everett De Morier: Binghamton: The Valley of Creativity

Everett De Morier headshot

Everett De Morier

Binghamton born humorist, author, and novelist

Everett De Morier became a professional writer in 1994, when he sold a copy of his son’s ultrasound picture along with an article entitled “My Wife Is Having the Reincarnation of Elvis” to the Weekly World News. For this, he received fifty dollars and a Bat Boy T-shirt.

De Morier has appeared on CNN, Fox News Network, NPR, and ABC, as well as in The New York Times and the London Times. He has also written for In-Fisherman, Florida Keys, Bride, and Parenting.

De Morier is the author of Crib Notes for the First Year of Marriage: A Survival Guide for Newlyweds and Crib Notes for the First Year of Fatherhood: A Survival Guide for New Fathers, both from Fairview Press.
For more information about Everett check out his website.

When his latest book, The Invention of Everything
Insights on Life, Food, and One Good Thermos, was complete, the publisher scheduled a pre-release tour in Binghamton due to the strong ties of the book to the area.

In wanting to connect Binghamton with these events, interviews were set up with local artists as background for the videographer traveling with them. But it was soon discovered that by using these book events as a framing device, you could capture great material about the lives of those who live and create in the area. People embraced the concept and the scope expanded.

And what started out needing only a single camera, migrated to full film and sound crews and the project took on an identity of its own. A documentary about the art scene in Binghamton.

On February 21st, Everett De Morier will read and sign his new book The Invention of Everything: Insights on Life, Food, and One Good Thermos. Then the documentary Binghamton: The Valley of Creativity, will premiere and be seen for the very first time.

Immediately after, the film will go live online and will be made free to the public.

Light food and refreshments provided kindly provided by The Belmar Pub & Grill.

Tuesday, February 19th, 2019 | BCAC Conference Space

4:00pm – 5:00pm Public Reading & Book Talk

Martin Bidney: A Hundred Artisanal Tonal Poems: Slimmed-down Fourteeners, Four-beat Lines, and Tight, sweet Harmonies.

Martin Bidney

Professor Emeritus
Binghamton University

Join us in the BCAC conference space for a public reading and book talk by Martin Bidney. The focus of this reading is Bidney’s A Hundred Artisanal Tonal Poems: Slimmed-down Fourteeners, Four-beat Lines, and Tight, sweet Harmonies.

“I want this book to be life-giving. I’ve called my poems “fourteeners” because the traditional name of “sonnets” might perhaps remind too many people of high school Shakespeare and boredom brain-death. (In fact, the bard’s fourteeners are a bisexual diary that could easily be a TV series—look at my Shakespair dialogues with him.) “Artisanal” suggests the care that craft-beer brewers take in choosing and preparing authentic ingredients. In my 100 poems, the components are chiefly “tonal” because I’m offering a musical entertainment. The poems are “slimmed down” to four-beat lines to give them the beauty we admire in a slender shape. And should the phrasing “tight, sweet harmonies” convey a sexual mood, that’s because poetry is passion. Every fourteener is provided with its own conversational intro—a “blog.” The topics range throughout my life and interests, and they include novelists, composers, philosophers, psychologists, mythic and religious traditions – an index of names at the back will direct you to these and the rest.” – Martin Bidney

Martin Bidney is an experienced Professor Emeritus at Binghamton University with a demonstrated thirty-five year history of working in higher education and since “retirement” a founder-editor of Dialogic Poetry Press and publisher of 23 books of poetry original and/or translated from Polish, Russian, and German (three of these titles with State University of New York Press). Skilled in verse translation and writing with a strong emphasis on faithfulness to rhythmic pattern and alliterative-assonantal word harmony. Strong education professional graduated with BA Indiana U, MA Harvard U, Ph.D. Indiana U.

A Hundred Artisanal Tonal Poems (Book Jacket)

To see think lecture, click here.

Saturday, February 9, 2019 | Artisan Gallery

1:00pm Book talk/Reading/Signing

Dr Elizabeth Tucker headshot

Dr. Elizabeth Tucker

“Legend Tripping: A Contemporary Legend Casebook”
U of Colorado/Utah State University Press, 2018

Legend Tripping: A Contemporary Legend Casebook explores the practice of legend tripping, wherein individuals or groups travel to a site where a legend is thought to have taken place. Legend tripping is a common informal practice depicted in epics, stories, novels, and film throughout both contemporary and historical vernacular culture. In this collection, contributors show how legend trips can express humanity’s interest in the frontier between life and death and the fascination with the possibility of personal contact with the supernatural or spiritual.

The volume presents both insightful research and useful pedagogy, making this an invaluable resource in the classroom. Selected major articles on legend tripping, with introductory sections written by the editors, are followed by discussion questions and projects designed to inspire readers to engage critically with legend traditions and customs of legend tripping and to explore possible meanings and symbolics at work. Suggested projects incorporate digital technology as it appears both in legends and in modes of legend tripping.

Legend Tripping is appropriate for students, general readers, and folklorists alike. It is the first volume in the International Society for Contemporary Legend Research series, a set of casebooks providing thorough and up-to-date studies that showcase a variety of scholarly approaches to contemporary legends, along with variants of legend texts, discussion questions, and projects for students.

Contributors: S. Elizabeth Bird, Bill Ellis, Carl Lindahl, Patricia M. Meley, Tim Prizer

*Free and open to the public

Saturday, January 26, 2019 | Artisan Gallery

1:00pm Public Lecture

Unity of Heaven and Humanity: The Philosophy of Ancient Chinese Arts

Joey Tsai headshot

Joey Tsai

School of Management
Binghamton University

Dr. Joey Tsai is an Assistant Professor of Management at Binghamton University’s School of Management. He has a master’s and bachelor’s degree in Psychology, and a Ph.D. in Management. Before his academic career, he worked for a consulting firm in Asia for three years when he traveled extensively for work and visited many historical and culturally rich cities in Asia including Ho Chi Minh City (Vietnam), Phnom Penh (Myanmar), Tibet, Guangzhou, Shanghai, Seoul, and Tokyo. Tsai’s interest in ancient Asian arts grew from these trips, and he began to collect arts and artifacts that resonate with him. Tsai’s professional training in leadership and human cognition, as well as his passion in history and arts, allow him to appreciate ancient Asian aesthetics, understand the Chinese philosophies embodied in these artworks and apply the wisdom (such as Feng Shui) to everyday life.

Tuesday, January 8th, 2019 | BCAC Conference Space

4:00pm – 5:00pm Public Reading & Book Talk

Martin Bidney: Rilke’s Art of Metric Melody

Martin Bidney

Professor Emeritus
Binghamton University

Join us in the BCAC conference space for a public reading and book talk by Martin Bidney. The focus of this reading is Bidney’s Rilke’s Art of Metric Melody. In this volume you’ll find, form-faithfully translated, New Poems I and II (1907–1908), containing 179 works by lyric poet Rainer Maria Rilke (1875–1926). An innovative feature is the pairing of each lyric with a “reply” poem by the translator or translated by him from another poet writing on a related theme. The result is a richly diverse book-length dialogue or symposium, a pioneering colloquy on comparative literature.

Martin Bidney is an experienced Professor Emeritus at Binghamton University with a demonstrated thirty-five year history of working in higher education and since “retirement” a founder-editor of Dialogic Poetry Press and publisher of 23 books of poetry original and/or translated from Polish, Russian, and German (three of these titles with State University of New York Press). Skilled in verse translation and writing with a strong emphasis on faithfulness to rhythmic pattern and alliterative-assonantal word harmony. Strong education professional graduated with BA Indiana U, MA Harvard U, Ph.D. Indiana U.

Rilke’s Art of Metric Melody (Book Jacket)

To view this lecture, click here.

Friday, November 2, 2018

5:30pm Public Lecture

NEW PERSPECTIVES ON ICE AGE ART

Rolf Quam headshot

Rolf Quam

Department of Anthropology
Binghamton University

Dr. Rolf Quam is a paleoanthropologist who studies the fossil remains of our closest evolutionary cousins the Neandertals. He has participated in field excavations at the Pleistocene archaeological sites of Atapuerca in northern Spain for the past 23 years and has authored numerous scientific publications. He teaches courses on human evolution at Binghamton University.

Public Lecture: New Perspectives on Ice Age Art
The earliest appearance of visual imagery or graphic representations in the archaeological record are found during the Upper Pleistocene time period on the African and European continents. Whether the capacity to produce art is limited to our own species, Homo sapiens, or was also present in some of our evolutionary relatives, like the Neandertals, is an open question. This public lecture considers some of the latest discoveries of Ice Age art and discusses the current thinking surrounding the origins of symbolism and its possible link with language and culture in our evolutionary past.

Venus of Laussel stone sculpture

Venus of Laussel (France, 25,000 years ago, Gravettian Culture)

Horse Figurine from Vogelherd sculpture

Horse Figurine from Vogelherd (Germany, 30,000 years ago, Aurignacian Culture)

Bison Figurine from Vogelherd sculpture

Bison Figurine from Vogelherd (Germany, 30,000 years ago, Aurignacian Culture)